CC sheriff logo 2018Sheriff Brian Burnett reports that 39-year-old Benjamin Hayden of Woodland, WA was injured this afternoon while snowmobiling near Sugarloaf Lookout approximately 12 miles northeast of Leavenworth.

At approximately 12:45pm Deputy Mike McLeod and USFS Law Enforcement Officer Mike Kujala were on routine snowmobile patrol near Sugarloaf Lookout when they observed a snowmobiler who appeared stuck at the bottom of a steep slope on the east side of the lookout. After making their way down the slope, they contacted Hayden who had suffered a fractured lower leg while attempting to free his snowmobile after it became stuck in the deep snow. Hayden who was by himself had been attempting to free his snowmobile for approximately 2 hours before the officers arrived.

While the officers were stabilizing Hayden’s leg, he went unconscious and became un-responsive. Due to the remote location, a Life Flight Helicopter was requested for Hayden. At approximately 2:30pm, Hayden was transported from the scene by Life Flight to Central Washington Hospital in Wenatchee.

The Chelan County Sheriff’s Office would like to remind snowmobilers that they should never ride alone. In this case if the officers would not have been in the area, Hayden may not have been discovered until he was reported overdue.

manson schoolThe Manson School Board is asking our community for nominations of Manson School District Staff Members who have made a significant contribution to the lives of students and/or the greater Manson community. The Manson School Board hopes to receive nominations from parents, students, former students, and community members who have been involved in our schools.

Selection criteria is as follows: one certificated employee (grades P-12) and one support staff employee (secretaries, bus drivers, custodians, para-professionals, food services, coaches, etc.) 

Nominations will be accepted until March 20, 2019 at noon. Winning nominees will be announced at the Manson School Board meeting on March 25, 2019 at 6:00 p.m.

Nominations forms are available online at the school district website www.manson.org, in both English and Spanish. If you should have any questions, please call the Manson School District office at 687-3140.

boyBB2019

The Manson Trojans traveled to the Tri-Cities this past weekend and performed well in two games at Hanford High School.  The first game on Friday the Trojans defeated the higher seeded Walla Walla Valley Academy 67-61 behind the sharp shooting of senior Avery Thompson who lead the team with 31 points. The following afternoon the Trojans battled league champion Oroville tough before falling 52-43.

This weekend the tournament shifts to the north with the CWB hosting teams from District 5 and 6 in Chelan on Friday and Saturday. Manson kicks the weekend off Friday at 3:30pm where they will face Tri-Cities Prep.   If Manson wins on Friday, they will play the winner of Columbia-Burbank and White Swan on Saturday at 12:15pm.  Manson needs to win both to earn spot in the regional round of the State Tournament.  Best of luck and Go Trojans!

ChelanFireRescueLogo200Chelan Fire and Rescue

Wednesday, February 20, 2019 at 3:00 P.M.
232 East Wapato, Chelan, WA

Proposed Chelan Fire and Rescue agenda pending Board approval.
Flag Salute:
Call to Order:
Approve Agenda:
Public Comment:
Consent Agenda:
* Revenue and Expenditure Report: December 2018 and January 2019
* Payroll: $124,605.18 January 1-31, 2019 Paid: 02-05-2019
* Vouchers for January 2019 General Account: Vouchers #18575 – 18596 for $18,846.97; Vouchers #18597 – 18612 for $21,964.57; Vouchers #18624 – 18634 for $7,337.36.
* Vouchers for January 2019 Capital Account: Vouchers #17088 - 17089 for $5,405.71; Vouchers #17090 for $5,500.00.
* Minutes: January 9 and 30, 2019.
Fire Chief Report:
* 2019 Budget / Emergency Response Report / Facilities/Apparatus/Equipment
◦ Deputy Chief Operations Report: Operations / Fire Prevention / Public Education / Career Staff
◦ Assistance Chief of Volunteer Services: Volunteer Recruitment and Training / Volunteer Staff
Firefighters Association Report:
Unfinished Business:
* Ladder 71 replacement apparatus
* AFG - SCBA
* Rescue Boat
* Hiring Process – Administrative Assistant
New Business:
* Resolution 2019-00 Surplus Fire Apparatus.
* DNR Phase II Grant
* Lake Chelan Emergency Services Submit 03/07/2019, 0900hr to 1100hr.
Special Event:
* 03/16/2019, 1800hr – 2018 awards Banquet, Campbell’s Resort.
* 03/29/2019, 1800hr – Faye Baker’s Retirement Party, Senior Center
Board for Volunteer Firefighters
* Invoices & Accident Report
Commissioner Comments: No action to be taken.
Executive Session:
RCW 42.30.110(1)(g). To evaluate the qualifications of an applicant for public employment or to review the performance of a public employee.
RCW 42.30.110(1)(c) to consider the minimum price at which real estate will be offered for sale or lease when public knowledge regarding such consideration would cause a likelihood of increased or decreased price.
Adjournment:

manson parks logo

Regular Board Meeting

142 Pedoi Street, Bumgarner Building, February 14, 2019, 4:10pm
I. Call to Order
II. Flag Salute
III. Election of Officers
IV. Agenda Additions and Deletions
V. Public Comment
VI. Approval of Minutes
a. January 3, 2018 Regular Meeting minutes
VII. Financial Review
a. Review Monthly Financial Report
b. Review and Approve Monthly Voucher
VIII. Old Business
a. Leffler Field
b. Maintenance vehicle
c. Marina Commercial Contract updates
d. Director’s Report
IX. New Business
a. Pacific Engineering services for 2019
b. Resolution 2019-01 (Surplus of goods)
c. Resolution 2019-02 (Wells Fargo credit card closures)
X. Adjournment
Next Regular Meeting: March 14, 2019 at 4:10pm, 142 Pedoi Street, Manson, WA 98831

co2alarmA public service message from your local fire district

Safety Tips

  • Have your home heating systems (including chimneys and vents) inspected and serviced annually by a trained service technician.
  • Never use portable generators inside homes or garages, even if doors and windows are open. Use generators outside only, far away from the home.
  • Never bring a charcoal grill into the house for heating or cooking. Do not barbeque in the garage.
  • Never use a gas range or oven for heating.
  • Open the fireplace damper before lighting a fire and keep it open until the ashes are cool. An open damper may help prevent build-up of poisonous gases inside the home.
  • Install battery-operated CO alarms or CO alarms with battery backup in your home outside separate sleeping areas.
  • Know the symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning: headache, dizziness, weakness, nausea, vomiting, sleepiness, and confusion. If you suspect CO poisoning, get outside to fresh air immediately and then call 911.

Know the Symptoms

Because CO is odorless, colorless and otherwise undetectable to the human senses, people may not know that they are being exposed. The initial symptoms of low to moderate CO poisoning are similar to the flu (but without the fever). They include:

  • Headache
  • Fatigue
  • Shortness of breath
  • Nausea
  • Dizziness
  • High level CO poisoning results in progressively more severe symptoms, including:
  • Mental confusion
  • Vomiting
  • Loss of muscular coordination
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Ultimately death

Symptom severity is related to both the CO level and the duration of exposure. For slowly developing residential CO problems, occupants and/or physicians can mistake mild to moderate CO poisoning symptoms for the flu, which sometimes results in tragic deaths. For rapidly developing, high level CO exposures (e.g. associated with use of generators in residential spaces), victims can rapidly become mentally confused and can lose muscle control without having first experienced milder symptoms, and they will likely die if not rescued.

(The following is an editorial and does not necessarily reflect the opinions of MVT)

burnett init 800

On December 31, 2018, the start of my third term as Chelan County Sheriff, I swore an oath, “That I will support the Constitution of the United States and the Constitution of the State of Washington, and will faithfully and impartially perform the duties of the office of sheriff to the best of my ability.”

In October of 2018, I submitted a letter / guest opinion to the Wenatchee World asking for voters to vote no against both I–940 and I–1638. (See attached)

The following statement, which I am in agreement with, was posted on the Washington State Sheriffs Association page on 1/01/19.

Initiative 1639 makes significant changes to the firearm laws of the State of Washington. The Washington State Sheriffs Association publicly opposed Initiative 1639 prior to the election. As the elected Sheriffs of our respective counties, we expressed our concern that the initiative placed greater restrictions on law-abiding citizens while creating unreasonable expectations regarding how such restrictions would be enforced. These concerns continue to exist today.

The initiative is being challenged in court, and concerns a topic about which many of us feel very strongly -- our rights as protected by the Second Amendment. As elected Sheriffs, we are sworn to uphold all rights protected by the Constitution. First and foremost, we are sworn to uphold the Rule of Law and the Constitution. We reaffirm our strong support for the Rule of Law and for the Courts to be the separate but equal branch of our government that interpret that law.

In recognition of this separation of powers we encourage all residents of our state to join us in balancing our opinions and beliefs on this issue with our commitment to our Oath of Office and to the Rule of Law, and ask that you work alongside us to resolve our differences within the framework of the Constitution.

As with many other laws, the application of Initiative 1639 will undoubtedly vary from county to county across the State, based on local priorities and resources available. We will continue to monitor the process as the Courts weigh in on any challenges, and look forward to working with the people of the State of Washington to improve public safety in all of our communities. http://washeriffs.org

As your Chelan County Sheriff, I am committed to serving the citizens in a way that both protects their Constitutional rights while being both fair and impartial while upholding the rule of law.

Respectfully,

Brian Burnett

Chelan County Sheriff

 

Screen Shot 2019 01 28 at 7

The Manson High School Vex Robotics Team attended the CWU League #3 Vex Robotics Tournament at Seattle Preparatory School on January 26-27, 2019.

The students earned 2nd place out of sixteen teams at the competition.

The team also earned the Programming Skills Champion Award for their robot’s autonomous software program. The Educator Award was awarded to their coach, Susan Sears.

The team is comprised of (L-R)- Titus Petersen, Jose Vazquez, Jonathan Sarmiento, Cole Cochran, Zoe Thomas, Cara Hutton, (not pictured) Rowan Evig, Connor and Grant Torgesen.

brandy and cassie

Manson School District is proud to announce that two elementary teachers, Cassandra Williams and Brandy Samson, have earned their National Board Certification for the 2018-19 school year in Early-Middle Childhood Literacy.

Like board-certified doctors and accountants, teachers who achieve National Board Certification have met rigorous standards through intensive study, expert evaluation, self-assessment and peer review. Manson School District now has 11 nationally board certified teachers with several more working towards completion.

Other National Board Certified teachers in are district are: Amy Anderson, Phil Fournier, Jay Fox, Anita Johanson, Steve Nygreen, Susan Sears, Katie Sperling, Heather Teague and Andrea Whitney.

MHS FBLA Winter 2019

Manson High School FBLA attended the North Central Region FBLA Winter Leadership Conference in Wenatchee on January 19, 2019.

Twenty-eight students placed in twenty-one events.

The following students placed at the regional conference and qualified for the Washington State FBLA Leadership Conference in April. Manson FBLA students placed 1st in five separate competitions and lead the region in number of students participating. 

Individuals:

  • Bailey Cameron – Cyber Security 2nd place

  • Bryan Bernardo – Cyber Security 5th place, Networking Concepts 1st place

  • Bryanna Harris – Introduction to Business 3rd place

  • Cara Hutton – Organizational Leadership 6th place

  • Cole Cochran – Securities & Investments 5th place, Spreadsheet Applications 4th place

  • Grant Torgesen- Introduction to Parliamentary Procedure 3rd place, Introduction to Financial Math 2nd place

  • Jose Pascasio – Business Calculations 3rd place, Securities & Investments 2nd place

  • Thea Batch – Introduction to Business Communication 1st place, Introduction to Business Procedure 5th place.

  • Ty Charlton – Advertising 1st place, Political Science 2nd place

  • Yessenia Villasenor – Client Service 6th place

Groups:

  • Brayan Cesar, Cole Cochran, Bryce La Mar, Conner Torgesen – Parlimentary Procedure 5th place

  • Briar Soliday, Trenton Stotko, Victor Calderon – Business Ethics 3rd place

  • Bryan Bernardo, Jose Pascasio, Christian Montes – Graphic Design 2nd place

  • Bryce La Mar, Conner Torgesen, Grant Torgesen – Business Ethics 6th place

  • Christian Montes, Parker Schoenwald, Jonathan Morales – Sports & Entertainment Management 3rd place

  • Cole Beazley, Caden Beazley, Bailey Cameron – Sports & Entertainment Management 1st place

  • Devyn Smith, Mara Vargas, Nadia Verduzco – Website Design 2nd place

  • Megan Clausen, Mara Vargas, Devyn Smith – Business Ethics 5th place

  • Oliver Ellingson, Victor Calderon, and Jake Lodwig – Digital Video Production 2nd place

  • Parker Schoenwald, Bailey Cameron, Caden Beazley – Hospitality Management 2nd place

  • Ty Charlton and Cole Beazley – Hospitality Management 1st place

  • Ty Charlton, Tucker Flowers, Parker Schoenwald – Business Ethics 4th place

Manson Trojan Buddies2019

Some very special guests were in attendance at Manson’s home basketball games on Tuesday, January 22nd.

A total of eight Manson Elementary students participated in the first annual Manson Trojan Buddy program.

Assistant Boys Basketball coach, Steve Nygreen, organized the event and gave elementary students the opportunity to pair up with a high school basketball player.

Prior to the game, Trojan Buddies had the opportunity to spend quality time with high school players and form positive relationships.

During the game, Trojan Buddies cheered on the team from behind the bench and enjoyed a post-game visit to the Trojan locker room to celebrate a victory against Liberty Bell. 

douglascountysheriff148On 01-26-19 at approximately 1219 AM Douglas County Deputies were dispatched to a report of a gunshot victim in the 400 block of Crane Orchard Road.

When Deputies arrived they learned Benjamin Pineda-Castrejon, a 32 year old male, of Bridgeport, sustained two gunshot wounds.

As a result of the initial investigation, Jaime Valdovinos-Sanchez, a 29 year old male, of Brewster, was arrested and booked into Okanogan County Jail for Assault in the first degree.

Benjamin was transported to CWH, and released several hours later with non-life threatening injuries.

There are no public safety concerns at this time. The investigation is ongoing.

WSDTlogo450The past is an unreliable predictor of the future, especially when it comes to transportation. This is an underlying message in Washington’s updated transportation policy plan, WTP 2040 and Beyond. It’s an online, interactive transportation plan – the first of its kind in the nation – and is available at www.WTP2040andBeyond.com.

During the plan’s creation, the Washington State Transportation Commission engaged diverse representatives to ensure recommendations presented a fair and balanced picture of issues and opportunities across the state. The commission presented the plan to Governor Inslee and the Washington State Legislature this week.

WTP 2040 and Beyond extends the state’s planning horizon out to 2040 and shines a light on the challenges and opportunities facing the statewide transportation system, emphasizing: 1) technology and innovation, 2) system resilience, and 3) paying for transportation.

The vision is unchanged: a transportation system supporting safe and reliable mobility for people and goods. Today, what is different, is the degree of influence that technology and innovation are having on the transportation system and the effect those changes are having on what safe and reliable mobility means.

The commission also heard a growing sense of urgency across the state about the vulnerabilities in Washington’s transportation system, which will undermine essential emergency response and long-term recovery efforts after a major disaster. This includes retrofits for earthquakes and other natural disasters.

Another challenge to the state’s transportation vision is lack of funding, not only for system resiliency, but even for the most basic preservation and maintenance functions. This continues to challenge local and state transportation agencies as they work to keep the system that is already in place running safely and efficiently. Old models of paying for transportation aren’t keeping up with current needs, resulting in local taxpayers picking up an ever-larger share of transportation funding responsibilities in an effort to make ends meet.

“When we look around the state, we recognize the hard choices that communities are facing when it comes to paying for transportation,” said Jerry Litt, chair of the seven-member citizen Transportation Commission. “They’re working to make the best use of existing resources and stretch their transportation dollars further, but it’s an expensive system to maintain. Existing revenues don’t cover all the basic needs, much less pay for the retrofits and upgrades that are needed.”

Secretary of Transportation Roger Millar concurs, adding, “Washington’s citizens have invested about $200 billion in transportation system assets, such as highways, bridges, ferries and facilities, yet we’re spending less than half of what we should to preserve and maintain those assets to keep them in a state of good repair. We need to continue working with our communities to establish and deliver a long-term vision for the transportation system that serves people, goods, and services.”

WTP 2040 and Beyond looks at the effect the three cross-cutting topics have on Washington’s six statewide transportation goals of economic vitality, safety, preservation, mobility, environment and health, and stewardship. The plan highlights where progress can be made, even in times of uncertainty, by taking measured steps and emphasizing partnerships and collaboration.

“We appreciate the emphasis in this plan on partnerships and collaboration,” notes Andrea Weckmueller-Behringer, executive director of the Walla Walla Valley Metropolitan Planning Organization and chair of the state’s MPO-RTPO Coordinating Committee. “Now more than ever we need to work together to tackle these transportation issues. Every one of our regions has partnerships already in place that provide a strong foundation for the more refined work that WTP 2040 and Beyond calls for.”

WTP 2040 and Beyond is a policy plan and does not include project-specific funding recommendations. It does highlight four “tough topics” that are bigger than any one agency or jurisdiction can address, and which have statewide implications. Those topics are: 1) improving travel and trade across the Columbia River between Vancouver and Portland; 2) limitations on SeaTac airport passenger capacity; 3) improving long-distance, inter-regional public transportation; and 4) rebuilding and reinforcing the Puget Sound ferry systems, including state and locally operated ferries.

WTP 2040 and Beyond sets the stage for identifying projects, investment strategies, and responsibilities for tackling critical needs statewide. It also is designed to provide guidance so local and state plans can work in concert to keep Washington moving.

knowledgebowl2019

On Wednesday January 9th, Manson High School hosted their annual Knowledge Bowl (KB) Tournament.  “Typically, we have the northern region teams (e.g. Liberty Bell, Chelan, Okanogan, etc.) coming down to participate in the competition, but this year we had a huge turn out from the south too,” said Manson coach Phil Fournier.  With the southern tournament being cancelled last minute at Wahluke High School, there was a convergence of the southern and northern teams onto the Manson campus, a veritable North Central Washington (NCW) Knowledge Bowl Tournament. There were 11 schools and 29 teams, ranging from 4A to 2B battling it out. 

With the strong reputation of the intellectual acumen and friendly competitiveness of the NCW region and teams, the battles were intense and well fought.  Liberty Bell, a perennial favorite at State, took 1st place honors while Moses Lake, another juggernaut in State competition, took 2nd place. Manson took 13th place overall in this highly competitive field. Manson High School captain Ty Charlton enjoyed the competition and organization of the event. “It was bigger than previous years.  It ran smoothly and everyone had a good time.”  In between rounds, the various teams congregated to the student hub to check their results and fill up on some snacks and small conversation while a nice warm fire crackled in the background.

The Manson High School Knowledge Bowl team would like to thank the school district and community for the great success of this tournament: the use of teachers’ classrooms, the technological assistance and equipment, the dedication of our incredible readers and timers, and the gracious donations from Manson Red Apple and Manson Growers.   Coach Fournier added, “It was wonderful having Knowledge Bowl coaches from the various schools share with me about how great the tournament was and also about the amazing commitment of all community and staff members involved in this huge endeavor. It was a blast.”

ChelanFireRescueLogo200Position Announcement: Administrative Assistant

Chelan Fire and Rescue (CFR) headquartered in Chelan, Washington, is currently accepting applications to fill a position of Administrative Assistant. This is an outstanding opportunity to work closely with the front office to provide support for a variety of clerical functions across the District. The ideal candidate will demonstrate the highest standards of personal and professional conduct and be comfortable serving in a confidential position. Candidates can expect to work in an environment that is dynamic and service oriented. It is essential for the candidate to be highly skilled in administering and performing a variety of clerical and computer tasks. Excellent verbal and written skills, a high level of attention to detail, and the ability to properly administer District policies and be highly customer service orientated.

At time of hire, must possess and maintain a valid Washington State driver’s license AND have passed a complete background investigation, driving record check, employment history verification, and reference confirmation.

Salary and Benefits

The annual salary range is between $37,368 and $41,520 DOE. In addition, there is an extensive benefit package that includes medical, dental, vision benefits as well as participation in the PERS Retirement Plan.

Application Packet

The following application packet is DUE no later than 5:00 PM on Friday, February 1, 2019.

  • · Complete application from CFR website. (chelan7.com/operations/employment-volunteer/)
  • · Resume. (three-page maximum including cover letter)
  • · Personal and Professional References.
  • · Answers to the following essay questions. (no more than 1 page each)
  1. What is your experience working in a clerical position?
  2. What is your experience working with a Fire/EMS organization and/or the public sector?
  3. What are your current roles in the local community?

Selected candidates will move to the next stage of the process that may include a panel interview, skill testing and/or a Fire Chief Interview. The application packet may be hand delivered, mailed, or sent by private carrier (i.e., FEDEX, UPS, etc.). Please address your packet to: Chelan Fire and Rescue, Attn: Carol Kibler, 232 East Wapato Ave. / PO Box 1317 Chelan WA 98816. CHELAN FIRE AND RESCUE 232 East Wapato / PO Box 1317 Chelan, WA 98816 509.682.4476 / chelan7.com

Position Details

Description of District:

Located in Chelan, Washington, Chelan Fire and Rescue’s jurisdiction is located in Northeast Chelan County, covering 125 square miles around Lake Chelan and surrounding areas. With population of 3,500 in City Limits and 2,961 outside city of Chelan. A budget of $3.2 million currently allows 7 career, 65 volunteers and 6 administrative/support members to offer a full range of emergency services. These services include fire suppression, public education, technical rescue, hazardous materials, wildland–interface suppression, and full emergency medical services for basic life support responses. CFR provides emergency response services from 5 fire stations, one station staffed with 2 career 24/7. An administrative facility is located at our headquarters station 71 and serves as the district’s administrative office. On average, there are over 950 annual calls for service.

Qualifications/Requirements for the successful applicant include:

  • · Must hold or be able to obtain a valid Washington driver's license.
  • · Must pass a thorough background investigation.
  • · Must be bondable and insurable.
  • · Must be 18 and a high school or (GED) graduate
  • · Desirable AA degree or two (2) years of experience in a clerical setting. A BA is preferred.

The applicant must have demonstrated experience, skills, and characteristics, which include:

  • · High level of experience and enthusiasm to support the clerical functions of CFR District.
  • · High level of professionalism, work ethic and trustworthiness to be assigned confidential work.
  • · Ability to build and maintain effective working and interpersonal relationships with the community, District personnel, other public safety and political entities, and superiors.
  • · Ability to support vision, goals, and objectives in accordance with department policy.
  • · Demonstrated skills in clerical roles including being proficient in Microsoft Word, Excel, Outlook and Publisher.
  • · Ability to function independently when assigned work by supervisor or chief officers.
  • · Ability to trouble-shoot, problem-solve and identify issues as they arise.

Physical Requirements and Working Conditions:

  • · The physical demands and work environment described here are representative of those that must be met by an employee to successfully perform the essential functions of this job. Reasonable accommodations may be made to enable individuals with disabilities to perform the essential functions.
  • · There is a current job description in effect for this position.
  • · Work days and hours; Monday through Friday 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 40 hour work week with exception to overtime as approved.
  • · Work is generally performed in an office environment, but may also require driving to other District facilities. Attending to issues that arise will occasionally require a flexible and varied schedule.
  • · The ability to drive, lift 25 pounds, crawl under desk workstations, work in and around fire apparatus or

CHELAN FIRE AND RESCUE 232 East Wapato / PO Box 1317 Chelan, WA 98816 509.682.4476 / chelan7.com

sit or stand for extended periods of time is required.

  • · Work involves walking, talking, hearing, using hands to handle, feel, or operate objects, and reach with hands and arms. Vision abilities required by this job include close vision, distance vision, peripheral vision, depth perception, and the ability to adjust focus.
  • · The noise level in the work environment is usually moderately quiet while in the office, but may vary greatly at other District facilities.

The application packet, must be received in its entirety no later than 5:00 PM on Friday, February 1, 2019. It may be hand delivered, mailed, or sent by private carrier (i.e., FEDEX, UPS, etc.). Please address your packet to:

Chelan Fire and Rescue

232 East Wapato / PO Box 1317

Chelan WA 98816

Tentative Hiring Schedule: Application

Tuesday, January 15, 2019

Application Closing

Friday, February 1, 2019

Testing Process

Thursday, February 14, 2019

Interview – Oral Board

Tuesday, February 19, 2019

Chief and Admin Office Manager Interview

Thursday, February 28, 2019

Conditional Offer

Monday, March 4, 2019

Anticipated first day of employment with CFR

Monday, March 18, 2019

WSDTlogo450OLYMPIA – Several transportation organizations representing cities, counties, ports, and transit will discuss their priorities for the 2019 legislative session with the Transportation Commission at its meeting next week in Olympia. Other meeting highlights include a briefing on two proposed toll projects on interstates in the Portland area, plans for an upcoming review of ferry fares, and a presentation from a company that helps communities understand travel behavior and patterns by using diverse data sets.

The meeting starts at 9 a.m. both Wednesday, Jan. 23, and Thursday, Jan. 24, at the Transportation Building, 310 Maple Park Ave. SE, on the Capitol Campus in Olympia. This meeting is open to the public and persons wishing to speak to the commission may do so during several public comment periods throughout the meeting (see agenda for detail).

Wednesday’s meeting begins with a legislative preview from cities, counties, ports, and transit organizations. The Washington State Department of Transportation will follow this briefing with a presentation on the agency’s legislative and budget priorities. The commission is tasked with providing transportation policy recommendations to the Legislature and Governor, and these briefings keep the commission apprised of emerging priorities for all levels of government with transportation responsibilities.

Also on Wednesday, the commission and Washington State Ferries staff will provide an overview of a proposed ferry fare-adjustment process that will begin this spring. This process includes working with ferry-served communities to help inform the commission’s fare-setting decision making that will occur in July 2019, setting fares for the next two years (2019-2021).   The commission will consider a new approach this year that will seek input from ferry riders and communities earlier in the fare-setting process, before a fare proposal is released.

On Wednesday afternoon, the commission will learn about the Oregon Transportation Commission’s request to the Federal Highway Administration to allow tolling on portions of Interstate 5 and Interstate 205 in the Portland area. The Oregon Department of Transportation will provide a briefing of the process, the tolling options reviewed, what it is proposing, and the next steps. Washington’s commission is interested in learning more about Oregon’s approach to tolling and its potential effect on Washington’s commuters and businesses.

Following this briefing, WSDOT will report on the financial plan for the State Route 520 bridge and report on the first three-years of Interstate 405 express toll lane operations. WSDOT also will brief the commission on the status of completing the express toll lane system on I-405 from Bellevue south to Renton, and the existing State Route 167 high occupancy toll lanes.

Wednesday’s meeting concludes with a report on the results of the summer 2018 survey of the Ferry Riders’ Opinion Group survey panel. Along with on-board interviews, the survey evaluated the performance of the ferry system during the summer months and assessed the attitudes of summer ferry riders, including those who ride for recreational purposes.

On Thursday, UrbanLogiq will brief the commission on how analysis of big data from multiple sources can help communities understand travel behavior and trends. This tool can help cities better manage traffic and improve transportation planning. The commission also will hear about the 2019 legislative and policy initiatives of three state agencies that provide transportation grants to improve mobility in cities, counties, and for freight movement.

For more information about the commission and a complete meeting agenda, visit: www.wstc.wa.gov/

CC sheriff logo 2018Sheriff Brian Burnett reports on January 14th, 2019 Shawn Lewis, a 48 year old Entiat man was located deceased north of Entiat. He was found by a friend at the base of a ledge near milepost 221 on highway 97A.

Mr. Lewis had not been seen by family or friends since Friday, January 11th. His vehicle was located in a gravel area on the side of highway 97A during the evening of Sunday the 13th. Deputies responded to the area and did not locate Mr. Lewis. Family had already removed the vehicle and there was nothing to indicate he was still in the area. On Monday, Mr. Lewis’ friend went to the location and started hiking the hillside. He located Mr. Lewis at the bottom of a rock ledge several hundred yards from the roadway and reported it to the Sheriff’s Office.

Deputies and detectives responded to the location and found Mr. Lewis deceased with injuries consistent with a fall. It is unknown how Mr. Lewis fell but the hillside had snow and ice on it. It appeared Mr. Lewis had been there since at least the previous day.

pangborne logo 200A record number of Airline passengers flew out of Pangborn Memorial Airport in 2018. Passenger enplanements totaled 64,689 which represents a 7.2% increase over 2017. Passengers flying into the greater Wenatchee Valley totaled 62,874 a 7.1% increase from 2017. Total passenger volume of 127,563 is a record for the Airport.

Due to passenger growth in 2017, Alaska Air added additional flights during the summer and holidays in 2018. “Alaska continues to be a strong partner, adding more flights at busy travel times supporting local residents and businesses”, said Chelan County Port Commission President JC Baldwin.

The other major factor in the record passenger numbers was a significant reduction in cancellations in 2018. The percentage of cancelled flights fell from 5.9% in 2017 to 2.7% in 2018.

“As our community seeks more air service, they continued to use the expanded Seattle service, which is the best way to get more flights to more destinations in the future”, said Douglas County Port Commission President Jim Huffman.

2018 also marked important progress in the communities’ goal of securing additional air service. This past summer the Airport was awarded a $750,000 Federal grant to secure non-stop regional jet service between Pangborn Airport and the San Francisco Bay Area. This grant was matched by over $400,000 in local pledges.

The Airport has held meetings with several interested airlines with the goal of obtaining new service by mid-2020.

The Airport is jointly owned by the Ports of Chelan and Douglas Counties.

1821 ADA Ramp Plan A 180719

The Manson School District applied for and received an urgent repair grant from the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction in the amount of $110,097 to construct a wheel chair ramp at the elementary school. Eric Sivertson, Operations Manager submitted our application in the fall and was notified in early December that we were selected as one of the award recipients.

Construction on the ramp will begin in July of 2019 and should be completed by August of 2019. The ramp improves Manson Elementary ADA access allowing for both an interior (elevator) and exterior route to all portions of the building and grounds.

manson schoolManson School District

Replacement Educational Programs and Operation Levy

Placed on February 12, 2019 Ballot

The Manson School Board has passed a resolution placing a levy proposition on the February 12th 2019 Chelan County special election ballot. If approved, the levy would replace an expiring Maintenance and Operations (M & O) Levy passed by voters in February 2017.

The proposed levy is for 2 years 2020 & 2021 (Manson has historically run 2-year levies).

The current voter approved amount scheduled to be collected this year (2019) is $1,367,278. The tax rate is $1.50 per $1,000 of assessed value.

The proposed amounts are: 2020 $1,449,314 ($1.50 per $1,000) 2021 $1,536,273 ($1.50 per $1,000)

Manson’s EP & O levy funding is approximately 13% of the district’s total funding and either fully or partially supports:

  • Maintenance of school facilities, including custodial staff, equipment, supplies and utilities

  • Instructional programs/staff/technology:

    • College courses in the high school

    • Preschool for all 4 year olds

    • High school internship program

    • Support of the arts (music, drama, art)

    • Special Education (in addition to state/federal funding)

    • Vocational classes (shop, ag classes, business, technology, drones)

    • Technology support

    • Replacement of computers/devices

  • Beyond the School Day Programs

    • After school enrichment and academic intervention classes

    • Middle/High school athletics (coaches, referees, travel, uniforms, equipment)

    • Clubs (pep band, FBLA, FFA, Knowledge Bowl, robotics).

  • Food service program (fresh fruit/vegetable snacks)

  • Professional development/staff training

An informational meeting for the public will be held at Manson High School on February 4th at 6:30PM and additional informational meetings can be scheduled (687-3140). Information is also available on the district website at www.manson.org including an individual tax calculator where taxpayers can determine their estimated local school tax using their property assessed value amounts.


 

Manson School District

Replacement Capital Projects Levy

Placed on February 12, 2019 Ballot

The Manson School Board has passed a resolution placing a six-year capital projects levy on the February 12, 2019 ballot. This proposition would replace an expiring capital levy passed by voters in 2013 set to expire on December 31, 2019.

What would this capital projects levy do?

A committee of Manson community and staff members prioritized the following needs:

  1. Safety Improvements

    1. Redesigning and strengthening entrances to both schools

    2. Replacing doors, adding security cameras

    3. Replace aging fire suppression panels in each building

    4. Replace alarm/security panels

  2. Early Childhood Center

    1. Create a facility designed specifically for 3 & 4 year old children

    2. Free-up classroom space in the elementary

      1. Addresses need for small group spaces

  3. Redesign Elementary Parking/Traffic Area

    1. Expand parking for parents/visitors and staff

    2. Improve parent drop-off/pick-up location

    3. Relocate bus drop-off/pick-up location

  4. Replace Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) systems

    1. Majority of systems were installed in 1997-98 remodel – twenty-year life span is ending

  5. Remodel MS/HS student bathrooms

  6. Remodel MS/HS gymnasiums

    1. Replace aging wooden bleachers in MS(old) gym

  7. Replace fixtures in both buildings

    1. Plumbing, lighting and kitchen appliances

  8. Track resurfacing

    1. Proactively set aside funds to resurface when it becomes necessary

  9. Continue to invest in student technology/equipment

How much will this cost?

Fixed amount of dollars collected each year (this amount doesn’t fluctuate with assessed value changes)

$499,000 each year 2020-2025 (Previous capital levy amount was $595,000 each year (2014-2019)

Rates per $1000 of assessed property value

  • 2017 $0.72

  • 2018 $0.65

  • 2019 (current) $0.61

  • 2020 (proposed) $0.49

2019 Community Chili Feed a

douglascountysheriff148On 01/05/19 at approximately 9:55 pm, a Douglas County Deputy was on patrol following a vehicle (Mercedes Benz, 350) in the 5000 block of Rock Island Rd. The Deputy ran a registration check on the vehicle and learned it was a stolen vehicle out of Wenatchee. The Deputy initiated a traffic stop in the 1500 block of Ohio Street. The driver initially followed commands but then sped away. The deputy gave chase.

The driver of the stolen vehicle continued to try escape running stop signs and speeding at a high rate of speed. The pursuit went into Rock Island and then onto SR28 back towards East Wenatchee. After several, more turns, the vehicle was westbound on Grant Road approaching the East Wenatchee City limits at about 100 mph. The Deputy in the lead of the pursuit saw other vehicles and determined it was unsafe to continue the pursuit into the City limits. He discontinued pursuing the vehicle and notified dispatch and all other units in the area.

East Wenatchee Officers saw the vehicle as it entered the city limits and gave chase for a short time until the driver fled on foot. The driver was caught shortly thereafter. The driver was identified as Jesus Morales-Lozano a 26-year-old male out of East Wenatchee. Douglas County Deputies booked Jesus into CCRJ for possession of a stolen vehicle, attempting to elude a police vehicle, driving while license suspended in the third degree. Jesus also had an outstanding arrest warrant for driving while suspended in the third degree.

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Regular Board Meeting

142 Pedoi Street, Bumgarner Building, January 3, 2019, 4:10pm
I. Call to Order
II. Flag Salute
III. Agenda Additions and Deletions
IV. Public Comment
V. Conflict of Interest Acknowledgement Form
VI. Payroll and Voucher Authorization Form
VII. Approval of Minutes
a. December 13, 2018 Regular Meeting minutes
VIII. Financial Review
a. Review Monthly Financial Report
b. Review and Approve Monthly Voucher
IX. Old Business
a. Old Mill policy update
b. 2019 Goals and Objectives
c. Director’s Report
X. New Business
a. Leffler Field
b. Marina Commercial Contract updates
c. AAU rate increase
d. Old Mill pay station
e. Maintenance vehicle
XI. Adjournment
Next Regular Meeting: February 14, 2019 at 4:10pm, 142 Pedoi Street, Manson, WA 98831

CC sheriff logo 2018Sheriff Brian Burnett reports on December 20th, 2018, at around 2:45 pm the loss prevention department at the Chelan Walmart called RiverCom to report a theft in progress.  The suspects were seen carrying various items out a fire door exit where they had staged their vehicle for a quick getaway.  Chelan County Deputies responded to the location but the suspects had left prior to Deputies arrival.  The vehicle used in the theft was a newer white Chevrolet pickup truck with U Haul decals on the doors.  The suspects had stolen over $2,000 worth of electronics.  One of the suspects was identified from prior investigations as a 24 year old male from Arlington, WA. He had previously been trespassed from all Walmart properties following a 2018 arrest. 

An "Attempt to Locate Bolo" was sent out to all surrounding law enforcement agencies. Chelan Walmart staff notified the neighboring stores in Wenatchee and Omak to also be on the lookout for the suspects.  At around 5:45pm Omak Police responded to a suspicious call at the Omak Walmart. The suspects along with their vehicle had been observed at this location.  The suspects left the store when they saw law enforcement arrive on scene. The Omak Police and Okanogan County Sheriff's Office contacted the suspects a short time later in the suspect vehicle.  The driver of the vehicle and was arrested for Burglary 2nd degree and Theft 2nd degree. The 2nd suspect was identified as a 27 year old male from Lake Stevens, WA. He was identified as the other suspect in the Chelan Walmart theft, and was placed under arrest for Theft in the 2nd degree.   

Both subjects were booked into the Chelan County Regional Jail.  The loss prevention director for Wenatchee and Chelan Walmart's believe since November of 2018, the 24 year old suspect has stolen over $15,000 worth of merchandise.  Numerous additional charges are pending from the Wenatchee Police Department as well as other theft investigations on the Westside of the State. Charges could be amended to Organized Retail Theft based on the method employed by the suspects and the total value of items stolen between the two stores in Chelan County.  Organized Retail Theft is a Class B Felony.

The Chelan County Sheriff's Office would like to recognize the Omak Police Department, the Okanogan County Sheriff's Office and the Walmart's Loss Prevention Department for their help and collaboration.  It was a true team effort to capture these suspects. 

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celtic xmas

Lake Chelan Tourist Center presents its First Annual "Lake Chelan Christmas" with ~ Geoffrey Castle's Celtic Christmas.

It's First Year in the Lake Chelan Valley, legendary electric violinist Geoffrey Castle brings the Christmas magic with this dazzling concert, featuring the Seattle Irish Dance Company, The Geoffrey Castle Celtic Band, Guitarist and Irish Tenor Dan Connolly and singing sensation and former Miss Kirkland Emily McIntosh. Bagpiper David Wilkie will kick off the show.

Now in its 11th year, Geoffrey Castle's Celtic Christmas Celebration has become a new Northwest Holiday Tradition, bringing communities together to celebrate the magic and mystery of the season, with an Irish flair for fun!

Geoffrey Castle is a living legend on the electric six-string violin. His performance history includes playing music with members of supergroups like Heart, Queen, Journey, Bad Company, YES, Alice in Chains, Soundgarden, Blues Traveler, the Pogues, and the Neville Brothers, while releasing 12 albums on his own independent label and touring and performing all over the world.

The Seattle Irish Dancers are the only professional performance Irish dance company in the Pacific Northwest. They've performed with musicians from around the world - Gaelic Storm, The Chieftains, and Celtica Pipes Rock - to name just a few. They perform often with Geoffrey Castle and are excited to come to the Lake Chelan Valley. All other performances in Washington have sold out, so this is the last chance to see this years Celtic Christmas Concert.

This production was brought to the Lake Chelan Valley by the Lake Chelan Tourist Center in is efforts of creating Family Friendly Community Events & Entertainment.

Proceeds from this concert benefit Various Lake Chelan Community Events & Student Programs.

CHELAN PERFORMING ARTS CENTER (PAC)

215 WEBSTER AVE

CHELAN WA 98816

DECEMBER 20th 2018 / THURSDAY NIGHT (7pm - 9pm) Box Office Opens at 6:00pm Doors Open at 6:30pm

Tickets can be Purchased Online at: www.LakeChelanChristmas.com

PHONE ORDERS: 1-800-514-3849 / GROUP TICKETS: (509) 682-9150

In Person at: Damascus Rose Floral, 311 E Woodin Ave, Chelan & Allisons of Manson, 71 Wapato Way, Manson. (While Supplies Last)

apple judg379

Upper L-R: Raven Pope, Cody Fitzpatrick, Cole Cochran, Emily Valencia

Bottom L-r: Henry Armstrong, Blake Cochran, Teresa Venegas

The Manson FFA Apple Judging team consisting of Cody Fitzpatrick, Henry Armstrong, Blake Cochran Marcos Diaz, and Nadia Tejada, traveled to Kennewick, Washington to participate in the state FFA Apple Judging CDE.

It was an early morning start leaving the high school at 5am for the 3 ½ hour drive. There were 127 competitors with Blake Cochran placing 28th individual.

The team placed 11th overall out of 28 teams missing the top ten by a mere 1.5 points.

The contest consisted of 25 questions out of the private applicator pesticide manual, judging two sets of trays (one red delicious and one granny Smith), figuring maturity date from full bloom, showing the proper way to pressure test, grading 25 golden delicious and 25 red delicious apples, identifying 25 varieties of apples and pears, identifying 25 insects and 50 blemishes on the apples.

The team was excited about placing and look forward to next year

manson parks logo

Regular Board Meeting
142 Pedoi Street, Bumgarner Building, December 13, 2018, 4:10pm
I. Call to Order
II. Flag Salute
III. Agenda Additions and Deletions
IV. Public Comment
V. Approval of Minutes
a. November 8, 2018 Regular Meeting minutes
VI. Financial Review
a. Review Monthly Financial Report
b. Review and Approve Monthly Voucher
VII. Old Business
a. Willow Point Park
b. Manson Bay Waterfront Revitalization Project
c. Old Mill policy and rates
d. Goals and Objectives for 2019
e. 2019 Budget
f. Director’s Report
VIII. New Business
a. Lanny Armbruster memorial
b. Blackwatch contract
c. Paid Family & Medical Leave program
IX. Adjournment
Next Regular Meeting: January 10, 2019 at 4:10pm, 142 Pedoi Street, Manson, WA 98831

railroad bridge800

WSDOT Photo - Railraod Bridge before work

wsdot logoThe barricades east of Othello will be removed at noon Friday

OTHELLO – Work to replace the State Route 26 bridge deck over the Burlington Northern Santa Fe railroad tracks east of Othello will be complete at noon on Friday, Dec. 14. After barriers are removed by contractor crews working for the Washington State Department of Transportation, traffic between Colfax and Vantage will no longer need to use the 32-mile detour for this primary route between western Washington and Washington State University in Pullman.

Between now and Dec.14, the concrete barrier rails will cure for the necessary ten days since they were poured. Specialty crews will finish curbing and guardrail work, paint temporary striping and perform deck pavement grooving before traffic flow is restored at noon.

“Safety for travelers and workers is always WSDOT’s first priority and we appreciate the support and patience from parents and WSU students who were inconvenienced.  We are also grateful for the difficult work in harsh conditions accomplished by Degerstrom crews and BNSF,” said Project Engineer Dan Lewis. “At the same time, the simple detour has proven capable of safely accommodating high traffic volumes without significant delays.”

The deck replacement project began Oct. 15 and was expected to take six weeks. The contractor, N.A. Degerstrom Inc., initially hoped to finish the $1.2 million project by Nov. 21, but the new concrete bridge deck and rails could not be poured and cured following delays due to permitting and weather.

WSDTlogo450Dec. 11-12 meeting takes place in Olympia

OLYMPIA – An updated statewide transportation policy plan, Washington Transportation Plan 2040 and Beyond, ongoing transportation technology work and the first round of findings and recommendations on autonomous vehicle policy needs are on the Washington State Transportation Commission’s agenda next week in Olympia.

The meeting starts 9 a.m. Tuesday, Dec. 11, and at 8:30 a.m. Wednesday, Dec. 12, at the Transportation Building, 310 Maple Park Ave. SE, on the Capitol Campus in Olympia.

On Tuesday morning, the commission will receive a briefing on the Road-Rail Project Final Report, which recommends to the Legislature a statewide project list for separating road and rail traffic in places where they cross at the same level.

Then, the commission will continue its information gathering on transportation technology and autonomous vehicles so that it can provide timely and insightful recommendations to the Legislature in the 2019 session. First, the commission will hear from industry leaders on truck platooning. INRIX, an international traffic data company headquartered in Kirkland, has identified corridors that can most immediately benefit from freight truck platooning, including Interstate 5 in Oregon and Washington as a prime corridor. Platooning is when trucks, operating with autonomous systems, can safety follow each other at a close distance to achieve travel and fuel efficiency and increase safety. 

On Tuesday afternoon, the commission will receive a report on the progress of the Autonomous Vehicle Work Group and its subcommittees. This briefing and discussion will frame the commission’s report to the Legislature and Governor with findings and recommendations about autonomous vehicle policy needs prior to the 2019 session.

Tuesday’s agenda concludes with an update on the Road Usage Charge (RUC) pilot project and a briefing on the Office of Financial Management’s 2018 Transportation Attainment Report. This report measures areas of improvement and challenges to be addressed in the statewide transportation system and operations.

Wednesday morning’s agenda begins with a briefing on proposed changes to broaden the scope of the Commute Trip Reduction Program, a partnership with business to encourage their workers to drive alone less often, reduce carbon emissions and keep the busiest commute routes flowing.

The commission then turns to tolling items, beginning with an update on the tolling options under consideration for the “Gateway Program,” which relies on tolling revenues to complete the SR 509 and SR 167 connections with I-5 near SeaTac and in Pierce County. Following this, there will be an update on the Tacoma Narrows Bridge financial plan, and an overview of SR 520 tolling.

The meeting concludes with commission action to adopt WTP 2040 and Beyond, the long-range statewide transportation plan that establishes policy and fiscal guidance within the context of the six transportation policy goals established in law: promoting economic vitality, mobility, safety, preservation, environmental health and stewardship. This plan is updated every four years and provides guidance for other plans and statewide investments.

The commission also will adopt its 2018 Annual Report, which contains near-term policy and fiscal recommendations for the Legislature and Governor to consider in the 2019 session.

The commission meeting is open to the public and persons wishing to speak to the commission may do so during several public comment periods throughout the two-day meeting.

For more information about the commission and a complete meeting agenda, visit: www.wstc.wa.gov/

ChelanFireRescueLogo200AGENDA
Chelan Fire and Rescue
Wednesday, December 12, 2018 at 5:30 P.M.
232 East Wapato, Chelan, WA

Proposed Chelan Fire and Rescue agenda pending Board approval.

Flag Salute:
Call to Order:
Approve Agenda:
Public Comment:
Consent Agenda:
* Revenue and Expenditure Report: October 2018
* Payroll: $151,229.06 November 1-30, 2018 Paid: 12-05-2018
* Vouchers for November General Account: Vouchers #18454 – 18468 for $9,364.65; Vouchers #18469 – 18488 for $12,907.58; Vouchers #18489 – 18499 for $10,572.16; Vouchers 18500-18507 for $4,134.80.
* Vouchers for November Capital Account: Vouchers #17081 for $697.19.
* Minutes: November 14, 2018.
Fire Chief Report:
* 2018 Budget / Emergency Response Report / Facilities/Apparatus/Equipment
◦ Deputy Chief Operations Report: Operations / Fire Prevention / Public Education / Career Staff
◦ Assistance Chief of Volunteer Services: Volunteer Recruitment and Training / Volunteer Staff / Explores/Junior Firefighters
Firefighters Association Report:
Unfinished Business:
* Ladder 71
* Assistant to Firefighters Grant - SCBA
* Rescue Boat
New Business:
* 2019 Shift Staffing
* Hiring Process – Administrative Assistant
* Long Range Planning - Schedule Meeting
* Resolution 2018-07 – Commissioner Compensation Increase
* Change Board of Commissioner Meetings date and time
* Appoint Chairman of the Board and Secretary for 2019
Special Event:
* 12/18/2018, CFR Holiday Social - Station 71, 6-9
Board for Volunteer Firefighters
* Invoices & Accident Report
Commissioner Comments: No action to be taken.
Executive Session:
Adjournment:

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robotics2

Manson High School Robotics Club competed in their first competition on December 1, 2018 at Central Washington University. Students who attended were Cole Cochran, Jonathan Sarmiento, Cara Hutton, Zoe Thomas and Grant Torgesen. Students competed in the skills challenge where they earned  1st Place for their autonomous and driver control skills. 

Students also competed in the brackets challenge and earned 9th Place out of 16 teams who competed. This is the first year for Robotics Club and students are off to a great start!

Cara Hutton

Cara Hutton, freshman at Manson High School was invited to speak at a kick-off of Computer Science Education Week in Seattle at the Microsoft offices. 

Miriam Brady, TEALS Rural and Distance manager was impressed with Cara’s enthusiasm and her computer science experience that she observed while on a visit to Manson High School. 

Cara was one of three students chosen to speak at the event. 

Below is a video link that shares this great event.

Link to code.org page: https://www.youtube.com/user/CodeOrg/featured

adopt a tree 2018A Great Way to support the Orchard!

Looking for a stocking stuffer, a special gift to commemorate a memory or loved one, or to create a sense of caring and nurturing in a young person? Consider giving an adopted tree at the Buckner Orchard for 2019.

If the Buckner Orchard is going to continue as the treasure we know it to be, it must have caretakers now, as well as long into the future. What better way to ensure that future than by giving a child a gift of a tree!

The response of children who received trees is touching. They picked out their trees, wanting "to grow up" with a younger tree, pulling weeds, placing mouse guards, and running water to "their tree". They have become attached to "their" tree and now have a wonderful opportunity to care and help nurture a living thing for many years to come.

TREES ARE NOT JUST FOR CHILDREN!. Maybe you know someone who doesn't get to Stehekin often enough, who has a special memory of the Orchard, or you just want to support the work of the Foundation in caring for the Orchard? The adoption of trees also raises awareness of the Orchard and its care. 

Adopt-A-Tree is one way in which you can support the work of the Foundation in caring for the Buckner Orchard.  With your support much can be done to protect and conserve the heritage of this national treasure, and to continue its place as an important part of the Stehekin Community.

Adopt a tree for yourself and be a part of the Buckner Orchard!

Adopt-A-Tree funds are used exclusively to support the care and maintenance of the Buckner Orchard and are tax deductible.

HOW TO ADOPT A TREE

Step 1. E-mail us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to ensure a certificate arrives in time, providing the first and last name of the person the gift is being given to, as well as the address to which you would like it sent.  Be sure to include your e-mail address; this saves the Foundation both time and money in getting the receipt to you.

A personal message may be included on the certificate, such as, With love and fond memories, from Aunt Cinda and Uncle Jim.  You choose the one-line wording.

Step  2. Mail a check (@$25.00 per tree) to the Buckner Homestead Heritage Foundation,  PO Box 184, Manson, WA 98831. Because some may be given as Christmas gifts, a certificate will be mailed immediately, trusting that the appropriate payment will be forthcoming.

Certificates can also be sent to you in PDF format via e-mail, ready to print from your computer, name of the recipient included.  Let us know your preference.

RENEWALS

This is also a great time to renew trees adopted during previous years. Please let us know if a new certificate is needed and follow the directions above.

Adopt-A-Tree is one of three means by which the Foundation raises funds to support the Orchard and Homestead. The other two are memberships and donations. Please help us today and give a gift of love and caring.

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Web site:  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

The Buckner Homestead Heritage Foundation is a not-for-profit organization created specifically to support and preserve the Buckner Homestead and Orchard in Stehekin, Washington,

and is registered as such with the State of Washington and the IRS

(Tax ID #452913458)

CC sheriff logo 2018Funeral services to celebrate and honor the life of Sergeant Leandro Jasso will be held Sunday, December 9th at 11 a.m. at Cascade High School in Leavenworth. Motorist should expect delays as the funeral procession makes it way from East Wenatchee to Leavenworth Sunday morning.

The procession will depart Heritage Memorial Chapel in East Wenatchee at 9:30 a.m., head north on Valley Mall Parkway to Sunset Hwy, North on Sunset Hwy, and then east on State Highway 2 to Leavenworth. Intersections along the route will be temporarily closed as the procession passes through. Motorists should plan ahead and expect delays if they are traveling in the area.

If the public would like to show their respect to Sergeant Jasso and his family, the recommended viewing areas are Valley Mall Parkway in East Wenatchee and along Highway 2 from Riverbend Drive to the Chumstick Hwy in Leavenworth.

The funeral procession is being managed by local law enforcement and fire agencies from Chelan and Douglas Counties.

Coanda snow sleigh

Photo by Unknown - https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=At4DAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA359Photograph and article appeared in Popular Mechanics of March 1911, no author or photographer listed., Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=11767459

WENATCHEE, WA – The Chelan County Sheriff’s Office, in cooperation with the Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission and the Lake Wenatchee Recreation Club, is offering a free Snowmobile Safety Certification Class to young snowmobilers in December.

The free class is designed for youth ages 12 to 16 but is open to new riders of all ages. The class is scheduled for Saturday, December 8th from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Lake Wenatchee Recreation Club, 14400 Chiwawa Loop Rd, Leavenworth, WA.  Lunch will be provided for the participants by the Lake Wenatchee Rec. Club.

The key to safe snowmobiling lies in the operator’s knowledge, capabilities, limitations and understanding of the machine. It is recommended that snowmobilers be aware of weather and trail conditions and the safety of other winter sports enthusiasts, while respecting wildlife and the environment. The snowmobile safety course training includes:

  • Basic snowmobile maintenance.
  • Survival skills and dealing with emergencies, including avalanche awareness.
  • The proper clothing and equipment for winter weather.
  • Hand signals while riding and other basic skills.
  • Properly preparing for a ride.
  • Riding skills test.

Registration deadline is December 6th. A parent or guardian will need to sign a consent form for each child registered and sign them out at the conclusion of the class. For more information or to register, contact Deputy Rich Magnussen with the Chelan County Sheriff’s Office at (509) 667-6508 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

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DIABLO – Get the holiday decorations ready – the snowy season has arrived, at least in the mountains. Enough snow has fallen in the North Cascades that avalanche chutes are full and, for traveler safety, the 37-mile seasonal stretch of State Route 20 will close at 4 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 28.

 The Washington State Department of Transportation will swing the North Cascade Highway gates closed at milepost 134 near Diablo and milepost 171 near Mazama. This section will remain closed until sometime in 2019 when the snow stops falling and melts enough to make it safe for maintenance crews to plow the road.

 Winter access

Snowshoers, cross-country skiers, fat-tire bikers or snowmobilers can access the closed area throughout the winter. Parking is available near each closed gate. Anyone choosing to use the area should know the conditions, including avalanche risks, watch the forecast and bring proper gear.

 Later this winter, once there is significant snowfall, adventurers should plan for the gate closures to expand on both ends of the North Cascades Highway. In the Diablo area it will move back to milepost 130, on or after Jan. 2, 2019. The closure in Mazama will move back to milepost 178 once snow is too deep for snow blowers. Extending the closure area when the snow gets heavier and deeper saves money and resources. There will still be parking available at both closure locations.

 Highway history 

WSDOT opened the final section of SR 20/North Cascades Highway in 1972. Each year crews close it to vehicles for the winter due to the snow in the 27 avalanche chutes that loom above the highway. That closure usually happens in November or December. However, in previous years the highway has closed as early as October. The latest closing was Jan. 3, 1990 and in 1976-77 the highway remained open all winter due to the lack of snow.

 Spring 2019 reopening

Avalanche experts will assess conditions in the spring. When it is safe, WSDOT will move snow blowers, plows and loaders to the area to start clearing snow, removing winter debris and replacing damaged guardrail and signs. That clearing process usually takes about eight weeks.

ChelanFireRescueLogo200Commissioners Special Meeting

Thursday, November 29, 2018 at 4:00 p.m.

Agenda

            Flag Salute

Call to Order

Old Business

            Ladder 71 – Options

Adjournment

BurnBanLogoA Stage 1 burn ban in Chelan, Douglas, Kittitas and Okanogan counties expires at 4 p.m., Monday, Nov 26, 2018, according to the Washington Department of Ecology.

art dotWashington will become the first state to embed an artist in a statewide agency, bringing a creative approach to advancing the agency’s goals like improving safety, reducing congestion, promoting economic vitality, supporting multimodal transportation systems and creating healthier communities.

Nov. 20, 2018 — An artist-in-residence will spend a year working with the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) to help develop new ways to achieve agency goals through a first-of-its-kind program created by ArtPlace America and Transportation for America, a program of Smart Growth America. WSDOT will be the first stage agency in the country to pilot an artist-in-residence program.

Applications are now open for artists interested in the year-long position, which will be located within WSDOT. The call for artists and application can be found here: https://smartgrowthamerica.org/program/arts-culture/wsdot-air/

Recognized as a tool for pioneering innovative and creative solutions, artist-in-residence programs have been piloted across the nation in municipal governmental agencies, including the Los Angeles and Seattle DOTs, but never before at a statewide agency.

Several organizations collaborated on the artist-in-residence program. ArtPlace America is providing a $125,000 grant for the program, including a $40,000 stipend for the selected artist and $25,000 for a final project(s) the artist and staff develop. Transportation for America (T4A) will administer both the funds and the overall program, including providing staff and consulting assistance. The State Smart Transportation Initiative (SSTI) will also provide staff support. Both T4A and SSTI are programs of Smart Growth America. WSDOT will supply in-kind contributions consisting of work space for the selected artist and staff time for agency workers to collaborate on the groundbreaking new program.

“Artists can provide fresh approaches and new ways of doing things, interpret complex processes, and provide unique perspectives for existing programs,” said Ben Stone, Smart Growth America’s director of arts & culture. “While a handful of cities have embedded artists in various departments over the years, WSDOT will be the first statewide agency to embark on such a program. We’re excited to be a part of helping Washington state harness arts and creativity to create better supported and more beloved transportation projects that help accomplish the state’s goals.”

Why employ an artist-in-residence?

“This type of program has a proven track record at the municipal level by bringing creativity to design challenges, increasing community buy-in, fostering deeper community engagement, building relationships with underrepresented communities and helping improve processes for day-to-day work," said Roger Millar, WSDOT’s secretary of transportation. “Our goal is to find innovative ways to better engage the communities we serve and deliver the best possible transportation projects.”

What will an artist-in-residence do?

The residency will run for one year with rotations through WSDOT’s core divisions to gain knowledge on the agency’s operations, priorities and challenges. The artist will then propose projects to address WSDOT’s overarching goals while improving community engagement, supporting alternatives to single occupancy vehicle transport and enhancing safety and equity. After four months of rotations, eight months will be devoted to the artist’s project(s) development and production.

Cities across the country have engaged artists-in-residence to support their efforts. The Seattle Housing Authority has engaged artists-in-residence to collaboratively produce art with residents of Yesler Terrace that celebrates the community's culture and history, builds connections to the adjacent neighborhoods, and connects residents to the arts. The Seattle Department of Transportation has embedded artists-in-residence in the northwest tower of the Fremont Bridge to produce art and performances that explore the historic bridge's role and meaning in Seattle.

The Los Angeles Department of Transportation's artists-in-residence have installed interactive artistic elements to bus shelters, taught storytelling skills to the DOT staff to help them better communicate their projects to the public, and served as a bridge between transportation advocates and DOT staff. In Minneapolis, artists-in-residence have used theatre to help the city's Regulatory Services Department staff develop more empathetic policies and better relate to their constituents, while St Paul's artists-in-residence have worked to make community meetings more creative, fun, and productive.

“We are thrilled to invest in the first artist-in-residence program within state government, and to share the results with state departments of transportation across the country,” said Jamie Bennett, ArtPlace America’s executive director.  “WSDOT will establish a valuable model for how artists can contribute toward the planning, creation and utilization of safe, sustainable and integrated multimodal transportation system.”

The artist will be based in WSDOT’s headquarters in Olympia, but may also work from one of WSDOT’s regional offices in Spokane, Wenatchee, Shoreline, Tumwater, Union Gap, or Vancouver for part of the residency.

Interested artists can learn more about the position and apply for consideration here: https://smartgrowthamerica.org/program/arts-culture/wsdot-air/.

Equal Opportunity Employment

Equal opportunity and having a diverse staff are fundamental principles at Transportation for America. Employment and promotional opportunities are based upon individual capabilities and qualifications without regard to race, color, religion, gender, pregnancy, sexual orientation/preference, age, national origin, marital status, citizenship, disability, veteran status, or any other protected characteristic as established under law.

BurnBanLogoA ban on outdoor burning and the use of uncertified stoves and fireplaces begins 10 a.m. Saturday in Chelan, Douglas, Kittitas, Klickitat and Okanogan Counties due to poor air quality in the region. Restrictions on burning will continue until further notice.

The Washington Department of Ecology is calling the ban because stagnant conditions are predicted to return in these counties after a brief break, putting the communities at risk for unhealthy levels of air pollution. In the first half of this week monitors showed elevated levels of air pollutants. Fine particles from wood smoke can easily get into people’s lungs causing heart and breathing problems.

Under a Stage 1 ban, all outdoor burning is prohibited including residential, agricultural and forest burning. Use of uncertified wood stoves, fireplaces, inserts, and other uncertified wood-burning devices are prohibited unless they are a home’s only adequate source of heat. Cleaner burning certified wood stoves, pellet stoves and other certified wood-burning devices are allowed.

Call 866-211-6284 if you think someone is illegally burning or you are impacted by smoke.

Up-to-date burn ban information is available at www.waburnbans.net.